A Little Light Magic

A Little Night Magic invites artists and designers to use the medium of
architectural lighting to dream and imagine narratives via the canvasses
of these buildings. These narratives can be fantastical, surreal or factual.

The Civic-Cultural district of Bras Brasah-Bugis has some of our oldest buildings and public institutions gracing its grounds. These buildings aren't just architectural monuments, but are vessels of rich histories, untold stories and forgotten memories, inextricably linked to their contextual surroundings. Conserved and re-adapted to modern use, each of them has evolved through the ages into its current status.

Lighting on our buildings, streetscape and landscape plays a huge and important part in sculpting a bewitching atmosphere. Good lighting and lighting installations, when employed subtly and cleverly, not only can reveal, but also highlight features, details and nuances of the city and its buildings not seen in bright daylight.
A Little Night Magic invites artists and designers to use the medium of architectural lighting to dream and imagine narratives via the canvasses of these buildings. These narratives can be fantastical, surreal or factual. As daylight slowly disappears, and nighttime comes on, these buildings, together with the cityscapes around them can become places of respite, a reverie of dreams, inviting the city dwellers to slow down, ponder and wonder about them.

A total of six buildings are involved in the lightup. They are the Armenian Church, The Peranakan Museum, SAM at 8Q, Singapore Art Museum, SOTA and National Museum of Singapore. The six artists and collective specially commissioned for A Little Night Magic are Lim Woan Wen, Michael Lee, 10AM+Eli Marc, :phunk, kwodrent and whenligtswork+Luke Smith-Wightman. A Little Night Magic is proudly presented by the National Heritage Board.
LOCATION
Singapore
YEAR
Completion 2011
DISCIPLINE
GRAPHIC, CURATORIAL
TYPOLOGY
PUBLIC SPACE
TEAM
Selwyn Low, Willie Koh, Lyn-Ann Loy, Oh Wenxin 
COLLABORATORS
Collaborator: Ong&Ong   |   Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning