Cara Cara
Cara Cara, the new hip hotel in the sunny island of Bali embodies a certain free spirited & wanderlust nature which we seek to capture through the architecture of the space.
Size: 3,200 square metres  /   Location: Bali, Indonesia  /   Year: Completion 2017
Type: Hospitality   /  Services: Interior, Branding
Team: Tiah Nan Chyuan, Clifford See, Susanne Teng, Steve Lim, Sarah Lew   /  Collaborators: Wastu Design   /  Photographer: Goderic Tia, Tino Renato
 
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Cara Cara, the new hip hotel in the sunny island of Bali embodies a certain free spirited & wanderlust nature which we seek to capture through the architecture of the space. Taking over the shell of an existing hotel, the spaces are transformed and given life through vibrant splashes of colours and textures. They are deliberately juxtaposed with the raw structural elements for an edgy contrast. The activities of the hotel are layered across the four levels of the building’s frontage to create an overlapping terrace. This created a lively visual communication across the various programs.
Circulations and corridors are naturally ventilated and voids are created to allow daylight to fill the space. The screens along the sides of the building frames the hotel to direct the visitors' focus within the space which is followed by the slanted towering screens which guides the circulation to the open double volume foyer.

Every room tells the tale of a different adventurer and the typology of each room is catered specifically to the needs of the guest’s choice. For the rooms, a simple combination of timber and light-coloured hues are used. Every little corner is fully utilised and the details of the bunkbed allows for maximum storage.
FARM LIFE IS THE HEART OF A RAINBOW
Life is the Heart of a Rainbow
The design intent was to create a clean, unobtrusive and neutral space
that respect and work with the strong artworks on display.
Size: 1,800 square metres  /   Location: Singapore  /   Year: Completion 2017
Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition
Team: Willie Koh, Benedict Tay, Oh Wenxin, Steve Lim, Wong Xiu Hui   /  Photographer: Khoo Guo Jie (Studio Periphery)
 
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Yayoi Kusama: Life is the Heart of the Rainbow is the first blockbuster show at National Gallery Singapore in 2017. FARM was engaged as the overall exhibition designer, and graphics and wayfinding designer for the exhibition.

The design intent was to create a clean, unobtrusive and neutral space that respect and work with the strong artworks on display, and is in harmony with the existing architectural qualities of the National Gallery.


It was a close tripartite working relationship between FARM, the National Gallery team and the Yayoi Kusama studio to overcome the numerous technical constraints and challenges to install the artworks. Most of the works require a visually 'clean' and uncluttered wall and ceiling space. Therefore a lot of time and care was taken to hide the various existing M&E services.

Wayfinding and exhibition graphics was designed to visually bring out and strengthen the brand of Kusama, employing colours and patterns which relate to her current oeuvre of works.
FARM VERANDAH HOUSE
Verandah House
Verandah House appropriates the age-old solution of verandas,
typical to colonial bungalows, as an in-between space
to protect the interior from harsh tropical extremities & afford privacy.
Size: 435 square metres  /   Location: Singapore  /   Year: Completion 2017
Type: Residential   /  Services: Interior, Architecture
Team: Tiah Nan Chyuan, Cheung Yu Ting, Jaclyn Chan, River Law   /  Photographer: Studio Periphery
 
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As time and technology march on, vernacular ways of building are often confined to the past. In Singapore, an island nation situated near the equator and constantly beset by sun, rain & humidity, the vernacular of tropical architecture has been rendered largely irrelevant by the modern conveniences of air-conditioning and concrete.

Situated on a gentle hillside in the suburbs off the Orchard area, the site of Verandah House boasts a near-constant breeze, creating the perfect opportunity for rethinking tropical architecture in a modern context. North-south cross-ventilation sets up the house’s basic form, culminating in a central double volume living space on the first storey that catches the breeze.

While in the north-south orientation, the site also posed a challenge as the entire façade is exposed to the western sun. With neighbours on higher ground and several residential high-rises in the area, privacy is also important to the client’s small, growing family. To mitigate these issues, Verandah House appropriates the age-old solution of verandas, typical to colonial bungalows, as an in-between space to protect the interior from harsh tropical extremities & afford privacy.
The idea was adapted into a series of ‘connected verandas’ which are linked across various floors, forming the main circulation spine on the external edges of the house, with private spaces
and bedrooms looking inward onto the double volume. Movement through the house becomes a journey of various framed views of the surroundings, afforded by the house’s elevated site. This
circulation space is kept naturally ventilated, with a composite wood façade screen providing protection from sun and rain.

Eschewing the flat concrete roof typical of modern construction, the house pitch roof profile references the form of historic vernacular architecture. By levelling out the house’s main floor, the site’s incline creates a basement which serves as a garage and new entrance. The house forms a natural relationship with its site, and the elements of roof, corridor and height blur the lines between shell and shelter, interior and exterior; the interaction of nature and architecture is not side-lined, but celebrated in Verandah House.
FARM AIRBNB SINGAPORE
Airbnb Singapore
Size: 2,800 square metres  /   Location: Singapore  /   Year: Completion 2016
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Peter Sim, Selwyn Low, Trina Ang, Ho Shuwei   /  Photographer: Beton Brut
 
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More info coming soon!
FARM THE CO. AT THE ROW
The Co. at The Row
Location: Kuala Lumpur  /  
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Selwyn Low, Clifford See   /  Photographer: Marc Tan (Studio Periphery)
 
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More info coming soon!
FARM LLOYD’S INN KUALA LUMPUR
Lloyd’s Inn Kuala Lumpur
By using interior design to determine the scale and logic of architecture,
Lloyd’s KL commits to the belief that hospitality can be tailored to the
individual without compromising the overall experience.
Location: Kuala Lumpur  /   Year: Estimated Completion 2017
Type: Hospitality   /  Services: Interior, Architecture, Branding
Team: Peter Sim, Tiah Nan Chyuan, Teo Guan Sin, Cheung Yuting, Dylan Quek, Trina Ang, Oh Wenxin
 
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How do you recreate the feeling of ground in the sky? This was the challenge faced in translating Lloyd’s Inn Singapore, a 2-storey boutique hotel surrounded by dense greenery into Lloyd’s KL, its high-rise iteration near Bukit Bintang in Kuala Lumpur.

To retain the serenity brought about by the immediacy of nature —a defining characteristic of Lloyd’s Inn— the design returns to the ethos of the hotel: bringing greenery into the hospitality experience, while catering for a varied guest list with the understanding that every visitor’s needs are different.

Mirroring Lloyd’s Inn’s eclectic mix of room typologies, Lloyd’s KL houses lofts, suites and rooms with their own private terrace, amongst others. Every room is lined with planter boxes, private verandas or small balconies, each a little hint of green. These natural spaces also aid in segmenting rooms and shading, creating maximum privacy with minimal visual obstruction. Businessmen, vacationing families and solo travellers all get to sit back at the end of the day and enjoy a quiet moment communing with nature, even on double-digit floors.
This focus on the individual guest is what informs the overall design of Lloyd’s KL; by establishing the spatial identity of the core hospitality experience, the room, circulation, service and common spaces can then come together to further strengthen this narrative. Corridors are kept naturally ventilated, and fins are introduced as sunshading devices. Coupled with the ever-present vegetation, which comes together to form a green façade for the hotel, a feeling of rawness, light and the natural is created.

Lloyd’s KL is an exercise in the bottom-up approach to designing large structures. It understands that ultimately, the strongest impression in hospitality comes from the guest room. Instead of generic spaces determined by structure, each room seeks to provide its inhabitant with a little patch of earth, suspended in the sky. By using interior design to determine the scale and logic of architecture, Lloyd’s KL commits to the belief that hospitality can be tailored to the individual without compromising the overall experience.
FARM TANG SHIPWRECK GALLERY
Tang Shipwreck Gallery
The most outstanding element is a wave of Changsha ceramic bowls, which crests along
the length of two display areas. An abstraction of turbulence and momentum,
the wave mimics the origins of the artefacts.
Location: Singapore  /   Year: Completion 2015
Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition, Branding
Team: Peter Sim, Dylan Quek, Kenneth Koh, Benedict Tay, Susanne Teng, Sarah Lew   /  Photographer: Beton Brut
 
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Geographically located along many historical trade routes, Singapore’s origins as a state and country are deeply anchored in its previous status as a fishing town and port. Maritime history becomes a key part of situating Singapore within the 9th century, through tracing its interactions with the world at large.

The Tang Shipwreck permanent exhibition, housed in the Khoo Teck Puat Gallery of the Asian Civilisations Museum’s new Riverfront Wing, comprises an impressive collection of ceramics, gold and silver objects chronicling trade between China, the Islamic world and Southeast Asia.

In deference to the beauty and importance of these artefacts, the exhibition layout is kept porous, flexible and quiet. A circulation path is not dictated, encouraging visitors to wander through at their own pace. Exhibit plinths are raised off the floor and are coloured in a darker, neutral palette, taking a back seat to the objects on display. Glass cases house the collection, inviting examination from a multitude of angles. The physical infrastructure is non-intrusive, creating a sense of transparency that permeates the exhibit.
This transparency allows visitors to immediately glimpse the entirety of the exhibition, provoking their curiosity to draw closer and consider each object at length. The most outstanding element is a wave of Changsha ceramic bowls, which crests along the length of two display areas. An abstraction of turbulence and momentum, the wave mimics the origins of the artefacts.

Through an honest and respectful presentation of these beautiful objects, the Tang Shipwreck exhibition places the interaction between visitor and artefact at the forefront of its design considerations. The narrative conclusion of the exhibit becomes unique to each individual, a private understanding reached between them and the remnants of history.
FARM NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SINGAPORE GALLERIES
National Museum of Singapore Galleries
Starting from the 1902s in a colonial black-and-white house, moving to the war-torn
cityscapes during the Syonan-To period, to the carefree kampong days in the 60s,
and culminating in the nostalgic drive-through cinema in the 80s.
Location: Singapore  /   Year: Completion 2015
Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition, Branding
Team: Willie Koh, Lee Huilian, Dylan Quek, Clifford See, Kenneth Koh, Susanne Teng   /  Photographer: Daniel Swee
 
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Every few years, our national heritage institutions undergo a major revamp to refresh both its contents and design. FARM is honoured to be the designer for the revamp of the four permanent galleries at level two of the National Museum of Singapore.

The four galleries previously themed after Fashion, Food, Film, and Photography, are now reshaped collectively to become the “Life in Singapore” galleries, spanning from the 1920s up till the 80s in Singapore, each one delving on personal stories and voices of the people. They are now called Modern Colony, Surviving Syonan, Growing Up and Voices of Singapore.
The main intention of the galleries is to transport visitors back to the eras where the stories took place. Each of the galleries is designed around a key identifiable contextual setting. Starting from the 1902s in a colonial black-and-white house, moving to the war-torn cityscapes during the Syonan-To period, to the carefree kampong days in the 60s, and culminating in the nostalgic drive-through cinema in the 80s.

In creating a highly immersive atmosphere, interactive multimedia installations, ambient soundscapes and even smells were employed to heighten the experience. The verandah of the colonial house has scent of an afternoon tea with soundscapes of jazz music and chatter in the background. Things take a sinister turn in the Syonan-To galleries with sounds of bombings and air raids and a city up in smokes.
FARM BREEZE BLOCK SHOPHOUSE
Breeze Block Shophouse
Size: 440 square metres  /   Location: Singapore  /   Year: Completion 2016
Type: Residential   /  Services: Interior, Architecture
Team: Peter Sim, Clifford See   /  Photographer: Fabian Ong
 
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More info coming soon!
FARM SINGAPURA700
Singapura700
Every section is created with an immersive, atmospheric
and theatrical setting to flesh out the storyline and contents.
Location: Singapore  /   Year: Completion 2015
Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition
Team: Willie Koh, Susanne Teng, Sarah Liew, Kenneth Koh, Lucille Lee   /  Photographer: Hai Han
 
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The exhibition traces 700 years in Singapore’s history through rich and atmospheric contextual settings that bring visitors back to the various eras. It served as the main anchor show at the National Museum whilst the museum is closed for a major revamp for one and half years.

The space is divided into 5 different sections, each presenting a key critical period in Singapore's history. Every section is created with an immersive, contextual and theatrical setting to flesh out the storyline and contents. The first section opens with a swampy forest, leading to an abstracted, multi-ramped hilly landscape containing the all-important Singapore's founding stone. This then leads through a time-leap into an old colonial streetscape populated with shophouses, godowns, Indian temples, Malay kampong houses.
The next section employs dramatic lighting and props to present the horrors and climate of Singapore during the Japanese Occupation from 1942-1945. Walls are awashed with huge graphics, flooded with intense red lights and deep shadows. Overhead planes, explosive bombs, and a re-creation of a prison cell added various details. At this point, we also introduced the use of soundscape - sirens, explosions, etc to add on to the atmosphere of fear.

The following section covers the tumult of our founding years leading up to our independence in 1965. Larger than life lightboxes, and a recreation of a rally stage brought these issues to life. Multimedia was also used to recreate and immerse the visitors in a racial riot scene.

Finally the story ends with the charms of the everyday in a typical HDB void deck estate in Singapore during the 1970s. To engage the kids and add more element of fun, a life size, old school merry-go-round was specially fabricated for the exhibition.
FARM ART CONNECTOR
Art Connector
The Art Connector brings the public to art and to the nation’s
two most prominent monuments. It connects two realms: the mundane with the cultural,
the everyday with art, the public with the state’s monuments.
Size: 2,100 square metres  /   Location: Singapore  /   Year: Completion 2015
Type: Culture, Sculpture   /  Services: Architecture   /  Award: Winner of The Art Connector Competition (Invited)
Team: Peter Sim, Kenneth Koh, Cheung Yuting   /  Collaborators: Grace Tan, Dr. Lilian Chee   /  Photographer: Darren Soh
 
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The Art Connector brings the public to art and to the nation’s two most prominent monuments. It connects two realms: the mundane with the cultural, the everyday with art, the public with the state’s monuments.

The Art Connector is inspired by the very substance which connects these divergent realms. Drawing from the constituent matter of the ground beneath our feet, the Art Connector is a public connector which speaks about the complex construction of Singapore’s ground—connecting millenarian natural geological formations to more recent manmade interventions borne from reclamation and building works. More importantly, it engages the natural instinct of the citizenry whose stake in the formation of this city-state is reciprocated with a visual understanding of how these different networks, processes, and agents come together to create the unseen layers on which we all stand today.On one hand, the underpinnings of this idea relate to evidence on site.

The two monuments—the old Supreme Court and the former City Hall— though adjacent and visually of similar Neo-classical architectural style, are in fact vastly differentiated in their construction processes precisely because of the variations of ground on which each monument is standing. On the other hand, in land-scarce Singapore, ground is commodified, valorized and fragile, and so, justifies some kind of poetic recognition. The Art Connector is complex. It is physical geography, natural geology and economic asset. It is also where we start families, grow neighbourhoods, cultivate communities, build a city, found a nation. It is the stuff we are made of.

In the Art Connector, the floor is made of these two components—the objective physical manifestations of ground, and the faces and voices of its people.
Bands of different colours made of materials collected from the built and natural environments—concrete, earth clay, iron oxides, granite, quartzite, marble, limestone, sand, brick, and washed copper slag, steel slag —create a new topography. These bands weave the natural and the man-made together. In so doing, this imaginative topography reflects the various materials’ actual proximities and complexities in the built environment. Like an intricate network of rivulets inscribed into bands of metal, the public will chance upon thousands of self-portraits.

People are the final layer that makes up Singapore’s ground. Drawing from the affirmative message of the National pledge, members of the public are invited to reflect upon their identities as Singaporeans by drawing expressive self-portraits, which will be then rendered as an accumulative pattern in the bands of the structure. This act of drawing and leaving a mark on the ground is instinctual, natural and is emblematic of a formalisation of ideas, thoughts and beliefs.

The Art Connector creates a new topography that reconciles a physical landscape with the emotive maps of individual identity and memories.

As a counterpoint to the floor, the underside of the roof is made of stainless steel rendered a rippled mirror finish. It quietly reflects the movements and connections made on the ground as well as between the art connector and its surrounding. The roof relates to the environment through its reflective surfaces and cloud-like canopy. This canopy echoes the shadows cast by trees in the adjacent Saint Andrew’s Cathedral. The organically placed columns further enhance this nature-inspired design. The overall imagery is resonant with that of a geological formation—crystallizing, layering, banding, folding, encrusting, binding.
FARM LLOYD’S INN SINGAPORE
Lloyd’s Inn Singapore
Everyone is different. But whilst different,
we also share a common appreciation for things of beauty and nature.
This is the main ethos that guided us for the revamp of Lloyd's Inn.
Location: Singapore  /   Year: Completed 2014
Type: Hospitality   /  Services: Interior, Branding, Objects
Team: Tiah Nan Chyuan, Selwyn Low, Torrance Goh, Lee Hui Lian, Lucille Lee, Susanne Teng, Trina Ang, Gareth Low   /  Photographer: Rebecca Toh
 
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Everyone is different. But whilst different, we also share a common appreciation for nature, space, light and texture - sensorial attributes that appeal to each of us. This is the main ethos that guided our design direction for the revamp of Lloyd's Inn - a 34-room boutique hotel in a quiet stretch of Singapore's shopping district, Orchard Road.

We were tasked to rebrand the hotel from the its logo, collaterals and website right down to the spaces and details for a holistic experience that will capture the essence of what it means to stay at Lloyd's.

The hotel's new logo is a playful take on the uniqueness and individuality of every traveller.
Each alphabet is slightly different in size and alignment coming together as a whole. The rest of collaterals and website follows this playful yet minimalist look which will dovetail into the spatial experience eventually.

The spatial design presents and layers the relationships between the city, the hotel, nature and the traveller via a minimalist and reductionist design language. There's no unnecessary ornamentations or symbolism. Instead each room and their interstitial spaces are designed to celebrate the beauty of raw materials like concrete and timber, with unexpected touches of nature creeping in via huge skylights, intimate courtyards, and double volume spaces that open to the skies. The rooms are also labelled as such - the Big Garden, The Skyroom, The Patio, The Reading etc.
FARM WHEELER’S YARD
Wheeler’s Yard
With the burgeoning of the cycling culture in Singapore, the site has all the right ingredients
to become just that - a laid-back, lifestyle place for cyclists, where they can rest,
get their repairs done, have a cuppa, and watch the world go by.
Location: Singapore  /   Year: Completion 2013
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior, Branding
Team: Tiah Nan Chyuan, Trina Ang, Oh Wenxin   /  Photographer: Beton Brut
 
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We were immediately drawn to the site, and who wouldn't? It was a huge industrial factory beside a park connector, nestled in the quaint neighborhood of Whampoa where residents would strolled, jogged or cycled in the quiet evenings. Previously used as a car repair workshop, the family-run business needed new ideas to revamp the place.

The brief was literally invented along the way. With the burgeoning of the cycling culture in Singapore, the site has all the right ingredients to become just that - a laid-back, lifestyle place for cyclists, where they can rest, get their repairs done, have a cuppa, and watch the world go by.
The voluminous space was split into two - a cafe and a huge open bicycle workshop. This makes for a rare commercial proposition as there would be no rental pressure. And the owners can have free play in the space. It is open and flexible, and totally programmable to cater for various events. The place has since hosted launch parties, fashion events and the likes.

Of course these days, it's not just your cyclists who drop by, the place is slowly becoming the hangout place in the neighborhood. Not bad at all, for an old factory.
FARM THE WALL HOUSE
The Wall House
This is a tale of two houses - similar looking, yet independent and coming together
to form a coherent whole. What links these two volumes together
is the huge central courtyard at the entrance.
Year: Completion 2013
Type: Residential   /  Services: Architecture
Team: Tiah Nan Chyuan, Lee Hui Lian   /  Collaborators: KD Architects, Locus Associates with Base6 and Terre Pte Ltd   /  Photographer: Bryan van der Beek and Edward Hendricks
 
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This is a tale of two houses - similar looking, yet independent and coming together to form a coherent whole. The two blocks sit on a sprawling piece of land, belonging respectively to the retired parents and one of their children.

This separation of the house into two blocks, in part a response to the sheer scale of the land, is also a requirement brief given by the clients. Programmatically, it consists of a two-storey block with the main living and master bedroom area, and a single-storey block housing the entertainment areas of the house.
What links these two volumes together is the huge central courtyard at the entrance expressed in an austere geometry of granite floor and wall, an organically shaped oculus and a minimalist planting of six willowy trees. Like a sparse yet artful Chinese landscape painting, this sets the tone for the rest of the spaces.

The landscape design, similar to the house, is also experienced in multiple correlated layers. It takes its inspiration from the philosophy of classical Chinese Garden where views are borrowed through cutouts and vistas, and where sight lines and spaces begin to overlap.
FARM JEWEL CAFE+BAR
Jewel Cafe+Bar
We interpreted the brief as that of placing a shiny jewel amongst
the rough and tumble that is Rangoon road.
We wanted it to be a design of contrasts.
Year: 2013 Completion
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior, Branding
Team: Peter Sim, Selwyn Low, Jesieca Sun, Sarah Lew   /  Photographer: Beton Brut
 
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The design of Jewel cafe and bar drew reference from the quirky character of the area and the name of the cafe, and interpreted the brief as that of placing a shiny jewel amongst the rough and tumble that is Rangoon road. We wanted it to be a design of contrasts.

We stripped the space down to its bare, rough concrete bones, to create an edgy and industrial
feel echoing the nature of the building and the street. This raw shell is then contrasted with "jewel-like" details and features made of more refined materials - crystal light bulbs, glass doors, teakwood paneling, and a brass and copper ceiling feature, amongst others. Overall we sought to create a series of dining spaces that was laid-back and relaxing yet elegant.
FARM THE POOL SHOPHOUSE
The Pool Shophouse
Through spatial and formal gestures, the dialogue between the old and the new
is constantly questioned and new discoveries revealed through
the shift in geometry, height, volume and material.
Year: Completion 2012
Type: Residential   /  Services: Architecture
Team: Tiah Nan Chyuan, Lee Hui Lian   /  Collaborators: KD architects   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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The Lorong 24A Shophouse Series was conceived as a collection of architectural experiments and showpiece for each architect. FARM, in collaboration with KD architects were thrilled to be invited as one of the 7 studios involved.

The conversation with the existing shophouse started with the intention to read the ‘new’ not as a ‘rear extension’ but as an ‘insertion’. We wanted to explore the spatial opportunities within such a configuration while heightening a unique experience inherent within the spatial structure of a shophouse.

The monolithic lap pool on the first storey emphasizes the linear typology of the space, as it guides one’s experience from the front to the rear. Extending this idea of linearity is the
monolithic volume at the rear which houses the private quarters on the upper levels.

One experiences the continuity of space through a series of stairs that loop through the shophouse. Central to this continuous loop is the skylight that marks the vital interface. It bathes this narrow linear space with resplendent sunlight, and visually connects different parts of the house.

Through these spatial and formal gestures, the dialogue between the old and the new is constantly questioned and new discoveries revealed through the shift in geometry, height, volume and material.
FARM IN THE MOOD FOR CHEONGSAM
In The Mood for Cheongsam
Evoking the sensual quality of the Cheongsam, the exhibition takes the form
of curvaceous walls similar to a large dress, sculpting pockets of spaces
where each display conceals and reveals, teases and surprises.
Location: Singapore  /   Year: Completion 2012
Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition, Branding
Team: Torrance Goh, Willie Koh, Clifford See, Susanne Teng   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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Alluding to the title of the show, the design plays up the mysteries and subtleties of the Cheongsam. Evoked by the sensual quality of the Cheongsam, the exhibition takes the form of curvaceous walls like a large dress, sculpting pockets of spaces where each display conceals and reveals, teases and surprises.

What is key to this idea are how the visitors encounter these soft pockets of spaces throughout the exhibition. Sometimes convex, other times concave in nature; sometimes expansive, at times intimate, we want to create an exhibition spatial experience that continues to surprise at
various sections within the singular idea. What's more, as a singular continuous space, the curvaceous walls teases the coming sections as the visitor walks along these gentle curves.

Providing a context to the various sections is key to provide differentiation and a narrative to the exhibition. Circular plinths, employed throughout, alter in form to suggest these changes in narrative and contect. Objects or simple furniture relevant to the era or theme of the section are also integrated together with the Cheongsam on display to create a mise-en-scene within the section.
FARM THE HOLE HOUSE
The Hole House
Our new addition to the front reads as a contemporary block
that is juxtaposed and linked to the old. And to differentiate this chasm
in time, we gave it a markedly different treatment.
Year: Completion 2011
Type: Residential   /  Services: Interior, Architecture
Team: Peter Sim, Adib Jalal, Dylan Quek   /  Collaborators: LR2J   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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This is a semi-detached house with layered histories. The original house itself consists of its’ back portion built in the 60s, and the front part 80s. The current owner has decided to demolish the front but retain the original back portion.

Our new addition to the front then reads as a contemporary block that is juxtaposed and linked to the old. And to differentiate this chasm in time, we gave it a markedly different treatment.

The new volume is completely constructed in concrete and retains its grand monolithic form. On the façade, openings of various sizes are freely punctured, animating the surface. But it’s more than just visual play; these openings react to the different functions behind them. The new master bedroom has large full height windows, whilst the bathroom is sprinkled with various smaller openings, modulating views and privacy.
FARM SKYVE
Skyve
In the spirit of playfulness and remembrances of lulling school days, the design for
Skyve Bistro was born. The bistro, thus named, also harks back to the
compounds' previous usage as a secondary school.
Year: Completion 2011
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior, Branding
Team: Peter Sim, Selwyn Low, Lee Hui Lian, Oh Wenxin   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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Who hasn't, in their school-going days, skip a class or two, just to sleep in late or catch a movie on a quiet afternoon? In that spirit of playfulness and remembrances of lulling languid days, the design for Skyve Bistro was born. The bistro, thus named, also harks back to the compounds' previous usage as a secondary school.

The bistro's interior is experienced in multiple layers, and can be separated into two main parts - the main dining area and the bar & drinks section. In response to the client's brief for a flexible spatial arrangement, folding metal screens are used to segregate the areas, but when collapsed together, opens into one huge space. And on closer look, these metal screens are cut in patterns inspired by traditional floor tile motifs.
Here, materials and choice of furnishings are selected and reinterpreted to evoke a laid-back old school charm. Wired glass, usually used as window louvres, now becomes tabletop surfaces. Dining chairs are made to look like old wooden classroom chairs. These are complemented with the terrazzo flooring and glass pendant lamps. Specially noteworthy is the commission of local furniture group Bureau, for designing a set of whimsical rocking chairs and other school canteen-inspired seating. We were told the rocking chairs are very irresistible, especially after a drink or two.

The theme of schooling and skyving extends to the overall branding and collaterals too. The menus look like a thick hardcover tome of a graduate thesis's book, whilst the write-up within is sprinkled playfully with notes and gibberish, all with good doses of humour ad well-intended irony.
FARM THE BRICK LOFT
The Brick Loft
Situated on the second storey of an old shophouse unit in the charming
Joo Chiat area, we wanted to reinvent, with a localised design language,
the concept of a modern and chic industrial loft.
Year: Completion 2011
Type: Residential   /  Services: Interior, Architecture
Team: Torrance Goh, Peter Sim, Hong Weiming   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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It is hard to imagine that this apartment was previously a dingy looking office unit. But obviously its new owners saw its potential, and we too, as well. Situated on the second storey of a shophouse unit in the charming Joo Chiat area, we wanted to reinvent, with a localised design language, the concept of a chic industrial loft. Well, we end up calling this apartment endearingly by the name of 'the brick loft house'.

From the onset, we knew the importance of bringing light and the sense of lightness to the space within. The apartment has to feel as if it's suffused with light. To do that, walls were knocked down to create an outdoor verandah area upon entry. Huge timber framed glass sliding doors are used to further increase light porosity. Generous amount of louvres are used at the rooftop to bring in more light to the mezzanine bedroom.
The feel of the industrial is brought out through the sensitive use of building materials and the reinvention of their vocabulary and usage. Taking a cue from concrete ventilation blocks found in old houses, we updated the look with a new custom-made pattern. This pattern is then abstracted and transformed again and brought into the living area via a laser-cut metal screen folding door.

The old plaster of the house was also peeled off to reveal bricks in their original gritty but charming condition. What are 'industrial lofts' without some bricks eh? Then using the idea of these bricks as basic building blocks, we created continuous wall shelving with a similar structure and framing. The key unmissable feature in the apartment is the spiral staircase constructed entirely out of metal, spray-painted all glossy white, and with its balustrade in the dangerously-sexy form of a curving brick wall.
FARM A LITTLE LIGHT MAGIC
A Little Light Magic
A Little Night Magic invites artists and designers to use the medium of
architectural lighting to dream and imagine narratives via the canvasses
of these buildings. These narratives can be fantastical, surreal or factual.
Year: Completion 2011
Type: Culture   /  Services: Branding, Curatorial
Team: Selwyn Low, Willie Koh, Lyn-Ann Loy, Oh Wenxin.   /  Collaborators: Ong&Ong   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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The Civic-Cultural district of Bras Brasah-Bugis has some of our oldest buildings and public institutions gracing its grounds. These buildings aren't just architectural monuments, but are vessels of rich histories, untold stories and forgotten memories, inextricably linked to their contextual surroundings. Conserved and re-adapted to modern use, each of them has evolved through the ages into its current status.

Lighting on our buildings, streetscape and landscape plays a huge and important part in sculpting a bewitching atmosphere. Good lighting and lighting installations, when employed subtly and cleverly, not only can reveal, but also highlight features, details and nuances of the city and its buildings not seen in bright daylight.
A Little Night Magic invites artists and designers to use the medium of architectural lighting to dream and imagine narratives via the canvasses of these buildings. These narratives can be fantastical, surreal or factual. As daylight slowly disappears, and nighttime comes on, these buildings, together with the cityscapes around them can become places of respite, a reverie of dreams, inviting the city dwellers to slow down, ponder and wonder about them.

A total of six buildings are involved in the lightup. They are the Armenian Church, The Peranakan Museum, SAM at 8Q, Singapore Art Museum, SOTA and National Museum of Singapore. The six artists and collective specially commissioned for A Little Night Magic are Lim Woan Wen, Michael Lee, 10AM+Eli Marc, :phunk, kwodrent and whenligtswork+Luke Smith-Wightman. A Little Night Magic is proudly presented by the National Heritage Board.
FARM THE PORCELAIN
The Porcelain
The spatial solutions are highly graphic and stylised with the porcelain emblem
serving as motifs in its various forms - from prints to actual vases and bowls
decorating the spaces, to the various guests rooms inspired by the porcelain motifs
Year: Completion 2011
Type: Hospitality   /  Services: Interior, Branding
Team: Tiah Nan Chyuan, Torrance Goh, Gene Tan, Susanne Teng   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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The project began with a first time hotelier in need of creating a hotel concept with rooms already planned out. We were tasked to make an all-round brand experience that is both unique in a popular hospitality spot and befitting the existing planning conditions.

The key was the location. The hotel, located in historic Chinatown, is also along Mosque Street (which was named after the Jamae Mosque at the end of the street). This provides an interesting proposition - the hotel can possibly express this confluence of cultures. "Blue Flowers" porcelain (青花 in mandarin) was subsequently devised, as it was developed in China
during the Tang Dynasty using cobalt blue pigments originating from the Middle East.

The spatial solutions are highly graphic and stylised with the porcelain emblem serving as motifs in its various forms - from prints to actual vases and bowls decorating the spaces, to the various guests rooms inspired by the porcelain motifs. A key feature that is consistently applied in the lobby and most rooms is the overhead circular barrisol light ceiling with intricate imprints of the Porcelain branding, suffusing the rooms with a gentle glow. Elsewhere, this graphic hand is carried throughout to the special interior fittings such as mirrors and various wayfinding elements.
FARM LAI CHUN YUEN
Lai Chun Yuen
To allude to Lai Chun Yuen's rich historical roots is our first critical step in the design.
In a bustling Chinatown where it's always visually exciting and chaotic, we wanted to create
a contrasting hospitality experience - an oasis of calm and grace.
Year: Proposed 2011
Type: Hospitality   /  Services: Interior, Branding
Team: Torrance Goh, Tiah Nan Chyuan, Ella Hadi, Dylan Quek
 
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Lai Chun Yuen was first built as a theatre house and became hugely popular in Chinatown for its Cantonese operas. This was in 1887. Almost 125 years later, in 2011, Lai Chun Yuen is brought back as a new luxurious boutique hotel with FARM as the Concept Interior designers.

To allude to Lai Chun Yuen's rich historical roots is our first critical step in the design. In a bustling Chinatown where it's always visually exciting and chaotic, we wanted to create a contrasting hospitality experience - an oasis of calm and grace.

Cantonese opera is one of the most visually extravagant amongst Chinese operas, abound with
complex symbolism and metaphors. To achieve this subtlety in design, we turn to their makeup and pared them down to their essence. Through the simple use of three main colours: Black, White and Red and the various shades in between, they will connote different characters and imbue various meanings.

Using this as starting points, we employ these colors across the various spaces and also translate them to different room types, typical of opera characters - the Scholar, Warrior and Majesty suites. Their unique and exquisite headpieces are also abstracted into various design features.
FARM AL-ANSAR MOSQUE
Al-Ansar Mosque
FARM, in partnership with KD Architects, is ecstatic to announce
our first win in a national architectural competition for
the rejuvenation of the ageing Al-Ansar Mosque.
Size: 4500 square metres  /   Location: Singapore  /   Year: Competition 2011, Estimated Completion 2013
Type: Culture   /  Services: Interior, Architecture   /  Award: Winning Competition Entry
Team: Tiah Nan Chyuan, Peter Sim, Dr Lilian Chee, Lee Hui Lian, Adib Jalal   /  Collaborators: KD Architects   /  Photographer: -
 
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FARM, in partnership with KD Architects, is ecstatic to announce our first win in a national architectural competition organised by the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore (MUIS) and Singapore Institute of Architects (SIA) for the rejuvenation of the ageing Al-Ansar Mosque.

The mosque is situated at a traffic junction and sits on a steep slope. The key design intent was to improve the accessibility and connectivity of the mosque to the surrounding estates by increasing the visual and physical porosity of the existing building, making it a truly community mosque.
A large ground plaza, sheltered from the weather and filled with huge steps and ramps is created as the main urban gesture. The identity of the mosque is strengthened with a clear relationship between old and new. The new, while it is boldly expressed as an addition, also gently embraces the old and maintains a separation with a series of airwells and high volume spaces which allows daylight to enter into the building.

The facade to the new volume reinstates the mosque's presence in the neighborhood. Constructed from a overlapping series of metal structures and mesh screens, it forms a highly intricate Arabesque-inspired pattern which filters daylight and views into the spaces within.
FARM INDIAN HERITAGE CENTRE
Indian Heritage Centre
The building is inspired by everything we love about Indian culture:
the energy, the dynamism and diversity; a wonderful kaleidoscope of cultures,
religions, landscapes, food, colour, sounds and smell.
Location: Singapore  /   Year: Competition 2011
Type: Culture   /  Services: Interior, Architecture   /  Award: Competition Finalist
Team: Tiah Nan Chyuan, Peter Sim, Dr Lilian Chee, Torrance Goh   /  Collaborators: Point Architects   /  Photographer: -
 
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FARM was one of four finalists in an architectural competition organised for the new Indian Heritage Centre to be built at the heart of Little India Historical District.

The building is inspired by everything we love about India: the energy, the dynamism and diversity; a wonderful kaleidoscope of cultures, religions, landscapes, food, color, sounds and smell. It is a collage of differences and everything in between; from the mountains to the sea, from the super rural to the super urban, from the ancient to the modern.

These thoughts are translated to a series of shifting layers stacked upon each other as a collage of differences. The individual layers will be cladded with different building materials
related to specific Indian motifs or materials to express the richness and diversity of India. A distinctive green mound at the roof level becomes an urban statement and focal point to capture the imagination of the visitors drawing them towards the new museum. The roof garden, which is open to the public, offers panoramic views of the surrounding area.

A series of long escalators at the backlane bring visitors to the roof garden before descending through the building into the various galleries and back into the street. This inverted circulation presents a unique way of experiencing a museum that complements the colorful and unique character of Little India.

This is a joint submission between FARM and Point Architects.
FARM BEAUTY IN BLACK
Beauty in Black
The design takes its spin from a fashion runway show where the
surrounding is always quite dark, and attention is focused
on the models and clothes.
Size: 100 square metres  /   Year: Completed 2011
Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition, Branding
Team: Torrance Goh, Willie Koh, Ella Hadi, Susanne Teng   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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Beauty in Black is an intimate exhibition featuring black dresses from the 1950s to 2000s from renowned designers like Rei Kawakubo, Karl Lagerfeld, and local names such as Benny Ong and Thomas Wee.

The design takes its spin from a fashion runway show where the surrounding is always quite dark, and attention is focused on the models and clothes. We wanted to explore finishes and materials for the space that are ‘softer’ in nature, which allude to the dresses, and with various textures.

A central platform is created as a distinctive feature to gather all the dresses. This allows one to walk around the dresses and take a closer look. The platform is lit from within, with all the
captions printed on it, each relating to the dresses suspended from above. From afar, it presents a mysterious sight of 18 intricate dresses afloat dramatically over a huge lantern.

We have also created a black felt carpet wall that wraps the surrounding spaces. This black ribbon wall extends outwards at the entrance, with its top gently curved to form a graceful collar, welcoming the visitor. The experience of this wall is highly textural too, as the exhibition texts are printed directly on it, giving the words a sensual quality.

In addition to spatial design, we are also responsible for the overall visual & graphic branding of the exhibition, which includes the main title logo, and all the captions and text within the exhibition.
FARM EYE CARE PEOPLE
Eye Care People
Reflecting the brand image, we wanted to create a warm homely experience using
a singular language of timber boxes to form
the walls, floor and the furniture.
Year: Completion 2011
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior, Branding
Team: Torrance Goh, Gene Tan, Oh Wenxin   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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Eyecare People is a boutique optical shop nestled in the charming district of Holland Village. It stocks the latest eyewear from top-notched frame designers and is equipped with state-of-the-art instrument for a highly personalised experience that truly cares for your eyes.

Reflecting the brand image, we wanted to create a warm homely experience using a singular language of timber boxes to form the walls, floor and the furniture. These timber elements, in
different shades of lacquer, work together to create display showcases, mirrors, storage cabinets, and even a sink.

The branding of the store takes on a more quirky approach. We took the name, abstracted the spectacle's silhouette and created an anthropomorphic logo. From this, we also created graphical monograms from a stash of falling spectacle frames.
FARM RASAPURA MASTERS
Rasapura Masters
The design centres around giving importance and highlighting these culinary Masters
in a large open site overlooking a central atrium. The master chefs are eventually housed in
individual islands, topped with a golden light ring, situated randomly across the site.
Size: 2600 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2011
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Peter Sim, Tiah Nan Chyuan, Hong Weiming, Oh Wenxin   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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Under the umbrella brand of local dining group Koufu's chain of eateries, the "Masters" sub-brand ranks as the most premium. With the opening of its Marina Bay Sands outlet, the "Rasapura Masters" foodcourt celebrates the culinary skills of Asian master chefs. We were tasked to create an Asian dining space befitting these masters.

The design centres around giving importance and highlighting these culinary "Masters" in a large open site overlooking a central atrium. The master chefs are eventually housed in individual islands, topped with a golden light ring, situated randomly across the site. These islands anchor the main space by creating a open frontage without closing off from the atrium.
They also create different pockets of smaller dining spaces within the larger foodcourt. This basic arrangement sets the backdrop for a ceiling feature that radiates outwards from the master chef islands and defines each smaller dining zone.

Elsewhere, the design details and other features reflect the atmosphere of eating street food and Asian cuisine. Different types of traditional floor tiles, ironmongery details, furniture and traditional glass pendant lamps are used and mixed throughout the space in a non-traditional sense to create unique pockets of eating corners and spaces. The resultant of these is a tactile and ever-changing spatial experience.
FARM BEYOND THE PYRAMIDS
Beyond the Pyramids

Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition
  /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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FARM RAMAYANA REVISITED
Ramayana Revisited

Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition
  /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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FARM PEEK!
Peek!
Peek! – the new toy & vintage camera shop in town goes the opposite direction
in a nostalgic throwback to the days of yore when the camera is all film and mechanical,
makes alot of sounds and lets the user recapture abit of their lost childhood, all over again.
Size: 200 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2010
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Peter Sim, Gene Tan, Hong Weiming   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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In our modern age of speed and efficiency, the camera – the tool for recording and capturing life has also become increasingly more high tech: faster, smaller, and packing in more and more pixels.

Peek! – the new toy & vintage camera shop in town goes the opposite direction in a nostalgic throwback to the days of yore when the camera is all film and mechanical, makes alot of sounds and lets the user recapture abit of their lost childhood, all over again.

The design of the shop is a response to this sentiment. The main retail store at the 1st storey is
reminiscent of an oldarchival library, complete with bookcases doubling up as display and a sliding ladder. But the treatment is contemporary – the bookcases are all glossy white with dashes of bright green. The intimate space is anchored by an oversized long golden table, where the merchandise are displayed adoringly under a canopy of old-style glass pendant lamps.

Upstairs at the 2nd storey where the office is, one enters yet into another nostalgic world – that of the old classrooms. What is immediately striking is the long chalk wall that spans the space. Here, you can jot down your notes to fellow colleagues, to-dos list or random quotes.
FARM X-RAY SPECS
X-Ray Specs
The reception room – the Room of Mirrors, is a dream-like box inspired by
the surreal spaces of cult films. It is part Alice in Wonderland,
part Matrix, and part David Lynch.
Size: 110 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2010
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Peter Sim, Tiah Nan Chyuan, Dylan Quek   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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This little advertising studio located in a charming shophouse in the Chinatown district is about our whims and choices. And rightfully so, as advertising is about persuading people to make certain choices – to buy this over that; to go here over there.

The reception room – the Room of Mirrors, is a dream-like box inspired by the surreal spaces of cult films. It is part Alice in Wonderland, part Matrix, and part David Lynch. It is a dark, mysterious, heavily panelled room, complete with Victorian armchairs and a console with a reading lamp. There are various doors leading to different spaces within the main office. Mirrored end walls multiply the space ad infinitum to a perfect symmetry.
The working office area is a striking departure from the reception. It is a mostly white space with little whimsical touches like cutouts of animals, lamps, bowler hats peeking out from cabinets and partitions. They are obvious nods to the owner’s penchant for pop culture comics and films.

The meeting room – The Room of Windows, is bathed in light and swathed with white curtains all round. Real and artifical windows (fitted with lights) behind the curtains constantly fill the room with bright daylight, no matter the hours or weather of the day.
FARM CONGO RIVER
Congo River
Using these plinths, we created a entire abstracted and sinuous landscape where one
circulates through the various sections of the exhibition in a linear fashion,
although experientially, it is more of an indirect and organic experience.
Size: 460 square metres  /   Year: Completed 2011
Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition
Team: Torrance Goh, Willie Koh, Ella Hadi, Susanne Teng   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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The three countries of the African continent in this exhibition share several common traits - the Bantu language, the majestic Congo River and the great land of Africa herself. We were inspired to design an exhibition that responds to the varied geography of these countries where these artifacts were originally found.

A study of the artifacts reveals similar characteristics amongst them -they are mostly figurines; they are not very large, and can be housed within a fixed dimension; and most of them will benefit from a all round view to be studied in closeups.
We wanted to ask if the method of display can be something more intrinsic and coherent to the whole spatial experience. We created plinths of various heights for the artifacts. They also serve as caption surfaces, seats, guide stands etc. As a design language, they form an organizational structure and logic to the space.

Using these plinths, we created a entire abstracted and sinuous landscape where one circulates through the various sections of the exhibition in a linear fashion, although experientially, it is more of an indirect and organic experience. They suggest, in parts, a forest, a meandering river, a hill, a temple, and a savannah grassland.
FARM THE CONCH
The Conch
This particular image keeps playing in our heads : An idyllic stroll along the beach,
we chance upon a conch, we hold it to our ears and
listen to the sounds of the sea.
Size: 500 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2010
Type: Sculpture
Team: Torrance Goh, Hong Weiming   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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Conceived as part of the lush landscape and the ‘Atoll’ open plaza at the Mapletree Business City, we imagined a work that gently reminds one of the various coral forms and lulling experiences at the beach.

This particular image keeps playing in our heads : An idyllic stroll along the beach, we chance upon a conch, we hold it to our ears and listen to the sounds of the sea.

The ‘Conch’ is both an outdoor steel sculpture and pavilion sculpted by its environment. Surrounded by tower blocks of the new business development, it presents itself as a highly fluid, wave-like sea of bells – its shape also reminiscent of the trumpet’s elegant sprouting form.
One can imagine walking beneath the sculpture as if one’s below the canopy of a lush forest. And then, from above at the offices’ floors, the view is of a singular organic shape land-art form, the multiplicity of parts playing out like the twirling polyps of a rich coral island.

It is also a poetic wind instrument, enabling one to listen to the ‘sea’, to the slight movement of the air. Each of the ‘Conch’s’ bells comes together to the ground collectively as stalks. They are dotted with funnels where one can put their ears and listen to the wind. Behaving like nature and taking from nature, the Conch is reactive and interacts in its own ways to people.
FARM NDP 2O1O
NDP 2O1O
The theme for the 45th National Day Parade 2O1O is a mix of the grandeur of our
aspirations and the intimacies of our wishes. We were the first design agency given
the opportunity to brand and design Singapore's birthday.
Year: Completion 2010
Type: Culture   /  Services: Branding
Team: Torrance Goh, Oh Wenxin, Susanne Teng
 
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The theme for the 45th National Day Parade 2O1O is a mix of the grandeur of our aspirations and the intimacies of our wishes – Live Our Dreams, Fly Our Flag. We were the first design agency ever given the opportunity to brand and design Singapore's birthday.

Our process began with the design of the main logo. We took inspiration from the Singapore flag and made a many many logos! The winning one depicts the five stars of our national flag with the accompanying shooting trails that resemble the movement of the crescent moon. A recurrent image we have is that of someone wishing upon a shooting star. It’s a classic and romantic image that appeals to all.
The branding aims to create a holistic experience. The overall look is kept elegant and minimal, favouring clean modern fonts, structured lines, centred-justified composition which we wanted to allude to the formality of having the parade held at the Padang once every 5 years.

Everything was carefully thought out – from tote bags to the magazine to ticket stubs to poncho cover, all in the national colours! A series of illustrated figures - we called them the NDP people - symbolising the different races of Singapore was created. They are found everywhere and ties together the whole look. We’ve also created a ‘fun box’ – a specially designed container for all the take-home souvenirs. The box attractively organises the various items, and feature different sets of mini board games designed just for NDP 2O1O!
FARM FIGARO HOUSE
Figaro House

Type: Residential   /  Services: Architecture
  /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
FARM FARM WATERLOO STUDIO
FARM Waterloo Studio
The space is a reflection of our working culture – openness, and the
intermingling of work and play. Strategically, everything is angled in such a way as a
welcoming gesture and layered spatial experience as one walks down the office.
Size: 400 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2010
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Selwyn Low, Torrance Goh, Hong Weiming   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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For those who’ve known us for quite abit and even popped by to say hello, yes, we’ve moved! From a modest space at the 2nd storey of a traditional pre-war shophouse, we are now at Waterloo Centre – a HDB and podium block typology built in the 1970s.

In subverting this conventional housing block-podium office design, we have chose to retain some of its original elements and gave it a contemporary treatment. We’ve kept the typical roller-shutter doors spanning the frontage, turning them into one gigantic signage. The main entrance door becomes a blown-up picture frame that pivots and rotates and draws one in.

The space is a reflection of our working culture – openness, and the intermingling of work and play. The central working zone is defined by a series of strong diagonals that cut through the
orthogonal space and are manifested as pieces of low-lying black furniture - long working tables and storage cabinets that keep the space open and allow unblocked views out to the luscious greenery and the streets. These diagonals then taper towards the entrance to become a casual seating-waiting and products display area.

Strategically, everything is angled in such a way as a welcoming gesture and layered spatial experience as one walks down the office. Elsewhere, this cheeky work and play idea continues in the meeting room where a fully functional table tennis table can be turned into a large meeting area when the need arises!

Come and pay us a visit. We'd love to welcome you to our new place!
FARM CLASSIC CONTEMPORARY EXHIBITION
Classic Contemporary Exhibition
Full height white curtains are used as the main element. They organise the space and
narrate the experience. They frame views and create vistas to artworks,
and sometimes, they provide a dramatic backdrop.
Size: 1000 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2010
Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition
Team: Torrance Goh, Willie Koh, Susanne Teng   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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This exhibition focuses on some of the most iconic contemporary Southeast Asian artworks in the collection of Singapore Art Museum collection and playfully asks the question: what makes an artwork ‘classic’ or ‘contemporary’ or both?

In addressing the curatorial direction of imbuing the show with a red carpet treatment, we wanted to use as minimal elements as possible which give hints of that stature and even a slight feel of glamour to the artists and their works. They should work together to create a neutral background so as not to overpower the works and provide a unified coherent experience.
Full height white curtains are used as the main element. They organise the space and narrate the experience. They frame views and create vistas to artworks, and sometimes, they provide a dramatic backdrop. The curtains lend an air of grandeur and austerity but at the same time provide a quiet contemplative space.

To complement the curtains, huge white lampshades are scattered throughout the space. Not only do they serve as ambient lighting and markers to each artwork, they are also designed to hold captions for each work.
FARM SHATEC INSTITUTES
Shatec Institutes
We wanted to envisage the school more than just a place to gain knowledge,
but also simulating that very environment where most of the
students would eventually work in – the hotel.
Size: 10000 square metres  /   Year: Proposed 2010
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Tiah Nan Chyuan, Torrance Goh, Dylan Quek
 
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Shatec Institutes is a much respected educational institution focusing on the hospitality and tourism lifestyle business established 25 years ago.  And for the first time, they are rebranding themselves. Their desire?  To be Asia's foremost institution for human capital development and thought leadership.

A major part of this rebranding takes the form of an architectectural competition to convert from a quaint 1960s industrial building into a new Shatec campus.  We wanted to envisage the school more than just a place to gain knowledge, but also simulating that very environment where most of the students would eventually work in – the hotel.  We thought to ourselves: doesn’t this constitute one of the best immersive learning experiences?
As such, key spaces of the campus are designed following hotel typologies and experiences.  The expansive terrace-inspired front lawn serves as a park to generously welcome all visitors and students and brings them right into the school’s main entrance where a light-filled and airy elegant lobby awaits.  At the other entrance, the public can also visit a museum dedicated to hospitality history.  But it doesn’t stop at the ground level, as one ascends to the roof top, an open-air café shaded by lush greenery serves up a good chill.  This is where the students and lecturers can indulge in a chat and enjoy views from around the campus, whiling away the lazy afternoon.
FARM JAMS
JAMS
We started by playing on the homophonic nature of the two words – jam and gems.
It is all about creating a new wonderful kind of precious desserts,
similar to the treasured stones and gems that we adore.
Size: 100 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2009
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Torrance Goh, Ella Hadi   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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JAMS is a new venture under the Bakery Depot group that differentiates itself by creating dessert concepts that appeal to a young but increasingly sophisticated crowd.

JAMS is a multi-collaborative effort. We are responsible for both the branding and design of the interior store. We started by playing on the homophonic nature of the two words – jam and gems. It is all about creating a new wonderful kind of precious desserts, similar to the treasured stones and gems that we adore. And thus the name JAMS was born. The idea of ‘jams’ as ‘gems’ is translated visually to the logo and all the collaterals (signages, menu etc), with them looking like diamonds and stones in various hues.
The design of the store addresses the odd-shaped plan and maximises the uninterrupted views of the busy Orchard road thoroughfare below. The main seating area lines the perimeter of these windows and custom built octogonal armchairs appear like scattered gems across the space. In this way, everyone gets a wonderful view out while indulging on sweet treats and dreaming away on coffee.

The rest of the store is anchored by a series of precisely cut furniture, as how one would shape and cut diamonds, with the long serving counter and island display table finished as multi-faceted angular objects (of desire).
FARM THE FOREST
The Forest
We wanted to create a porous architecture with generous views and light for the occupants.
Inspired by the organic forms of nature, our design strategy was to create a building
that has separate private and public faces
Size: 1700 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2011
Type: Hospitality   /  Services: Interior, Architecture, Branding
Team: Peter Sim, Dylan Quek, Adib Jalal, Hong Weiming, Oh Wenxin   /  Collaborators: KD Architects
 
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Located in the Novena area, the site for this 5-storey serviced apartment fronts a large and busy road.  The client asked for a luxurious and special building, with a distinctive façade.

We wanted to create a porous architecture with generous views and light for the occupants.  Inspired by the organic forms of nature, our design strategy was to create a building that has separate private and public faces.  By dividing the accommodation into two distinct but connected parts, the apartments could have two fronts, one facing the street and the other facing a landscaped poolside area.
The trees on the site inform our design – the façade facing the street is clad in a layered mesh screen inspired by the forms of tree trunks and the translucency of leaves.  The façade facing the pool area consists of an organic undulating screen and overlapping balconies.

And here's just a sneak preview.
FARM DENTAL ON THE BAY
Dental On The Bay

Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
  /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
FARM CHRISTIAN LACROIX DRESSER
Christian Lacroix Dresser
The dressing table is paramount to every performer. For the Christian Lacroix exhibition,
the dressing table forms the basis of our design where fun facts
about the opera will be introduced to the kids.

Type: Culture   /  Services: Objects
Team: Torrance Goh, Ella Hadi   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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The dressing table is paramount to every performer. It is the very threshold where transformation takes place – first physically, where the actor goes through make-up and costume; then symbolically where he conditions himself to become the character.

For the Christian Lacroix exhibition, the dressing table forms the basis of our design where fun facts about the opera will be introduced to the kids. To play up the theatricality, we blew up
the scale of the dressing table to incorporate the various information. Tabletops provide generous spaces for drawing activities and placement of objects. Mirrors are used as background for text and information. Drawers hide and reveal multitude of objects and other surprises.

Like a fantastical object from Alice in Wonderland, this table encourages everyone to have fun in exploring the world of opera.
FARM THE TREE
The Tree
"And as Paul Simon wistfully reminds us in his 1990 song Spirit Voices,
And slept on the banks on the leaves o a banyan tree...
Some stories are magical, meant to be sung."
Size: 100 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2009
Type: Sculpture   /  Award: President Design Award 2010 for Design of the Year.
Team: Torrance Goh, Peter Sim, Dr Lilian Chee, Willie Koh, Dylan Quek   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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When we think about the National Museum of Singapore, association with another grand old dame comes to mind. It is the huge old banyan tree that sits majestically on the museum’s front lawn, seemingly holding fort to a place full of histories, stories and magic.

We wanted to allude to all these richness and symbolism through a contemporary reading of the banyan tree. The Tree is a reconstruction from a series of interlocking frames with lights that pulsates gently in the night. Hanging microphones simulating that of aerial roots will also detect environment sounds and alter the lighting nature of the Tree – glowing intensely and dimming down with the rising and falling sound levels.
Just like in the past, as it is now, we hope this Tree will inspire people to slow down, take a breather and simply bask and partake in this recreation of nature’s wonder.

And as Paul Simon wistfully reminds us in his 1990 song Spirit Voices, “And slept on the banks on the leaves of a banyan tree… Some stories are magical, meant to be sung.”

The Tree was awarded President Design Award 2010 for Design of the Year.
FARM KIZUKI + LIM
Kizuki + LIM
The salon is a dialogue between two fictive spaces and narratives originating from
Isolation Unit’s and FARM’s design directions. We imagined this
white cube as a token from Japan, nesting itself within the local typology of the shophouse.
Size: 200 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2009
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Torrance Goh, Hong Weiming, Ella Hadi   /  Collaborators: Isolation Unit   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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‘Kizuki’ is the result of a collaboration between FARM and Japanese design studio Isolation Unit who is responsible for most of hair group LessisMore’s (LIM) ultra minimalist and chic salons in Japan.  The salon is a dialogue between two fictive spaces and narratives originating from Isolation Unit’s and FARM’s design directions.

Isolation Unit’s subtle intervention is manifested in the form of an oversized white rectilinear volume inserted into the exisiting shophouse fabric.  This juxtaposition of three volumes immediately creates spaces (new and existing) of various sizes, heights and angles, prompting encounters of pleasant surprises and discoveries, which in fact, is a titular response to the word ‘kizuki’.
FARM imagined this white cube as a token from Japan, nesting itself within the local typology of the shophouse.  We then seek to recreate a previous reincarnation of this unit (akin to the mise-en-scène of an old shophouse) – through various antique furniture & lighting that appeared to have shifted themselves and melted into the walls, generously welcoming the addition of our new Japanese cubes.  In this confluence of imagined dialogues and new quirky spaces, we hoped we have brought out the essence of Kizuki – both the word and the spirit of the salon.
FARM OUR PUNGGOL
Our Punggol
The new Slope is a continuous ground plane for the community to enjoy the parks and
communal facilities.  It sits on several bases of SOHO housing
that decreases in height from the East to the West.
Year: Competition 2009
Type: Residential   /  Services: Architecture
Team: Tiah Nan Chyuan, Peter Sim
 
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If we go back in time, the town of Punggol was once a thriving farming and fishing village.  It was a time replete with idyll and laid-back charms.

We took this as the genius loci of the place and created the identity of a new neighbourhood as a charming low-rise enclave just like it was before.  It will be set in a endless parkspace, where people choose to live to escape the stresses of everyday life.

Akin to a river delta landform, the master plan is conceived as distributaries fragmenting into various land parcels.  The spatial experiences vary as they start out as lush valleys at the East.
Within the central area, they are intimately scaled streets with lively streams and waterfalls.  Nearer to the river front, they are open promenades.

The new Slope is a continuous ground plane for the community to enjoy the parks and communal facilities.  It sits on several bases of SOHO housing that decreases in height from the East to the West.  A person can walk in a traffic-free environment from the peak of the slope all the way to Sungei Punggol at the other end!  And strategic placement of the housing blocks combined with the Slope also affords panaromic sea views to the majority of the dwellings on the slope.
FARM TAKE TWO ASIA HEADQUARTERS
Take Two Asia Headquarters
Inspired by the trailer of ‘Grand Theft Auto’ , the spatial experience is translated
into a monolithic black table that welcomes the visitor, dissects the main space and
spans 40m across the entire length of the office.
Size: 500 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2009
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Selwyn Low, Hong Weiming   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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Some of us here at FARM are avid fans of those highly-charged, adrenaline pumping interactive video games, and so when approached to create a whole immersive gaming experience in our design for a game headquarters office in Asia, you can imagine we are especially thrilled.

Take Two is a worldwide publisher, developer and distributor of those abovementioned games that we like and include the immensely popular ‘Grand Theft Auto’. To create these games, the Take Two guys worked in a very collaborative fashion, with frequent small team meetings, just like a startup, and they want a space where they can have fun together.
Inspired by the trailer of ‘Grand Theft Auto’ that features the protagonist amidst an ever-changing backdrop of storylines and cityscapes, the spatial experience is translated into a monolithic black table that welcomes the visitor, dissects the main space and spans 40m across the entire length of the office. We call this the Vice Table. Eventually culminating at the President’s room, the Vice Table serves a multitude of functions – meetings, casual chats, creative discussions or even a game or two. More than a piece of furniture, this table as a spatial connector and experience brings everyone together to the communal zone where they can chill and engage in some ‘healthy vices’.

The design of the whole office is emblematic of what we’ve always believed in – that spaces should fulfill more than their functional requirements; they should be fun, delightful and altogether surprising too.
FARM SERENITY IN STONE EXHIBITION
Serenity In Stone Exhibition

Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition
  /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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FARM BABA HOUSE GALLERY
Baba House Gallery
It is almost dictum that a contemporary art gallery space has to be as neutral
as possible to view and contemplate artworks. How do you design a contemporary
gallery space within a richly ornate historical building?
Size: 100 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2008
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Peter Sim, Torrance Goh, Hong Weiming   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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Peranakan architecture in all its ornate richness, consists of an eclectic mix of influences from the Southern Chinese, Malay, colonial Dutch and the British cultures.

To site a contemporary art gallery within the faithfully restored Baba House, we run into some dilemma. It is almost dictum that a contemporary art gallery space has to be as neutral as possible to view and contemplate artworks. How do you design a contemporary gallery space within a richly ornate historical building?
This new gallery, envisaged as a pure white room, is inserted into the restored fabric of the house. A ‘respectful distance’ is created between the ornate qualities of the conserved house and the neutrality of a contemporary art space. The new walls and floor planes are treated like a blank canvas - they are finished in white enamel, gently curved at the edges and ‘float’ above the existing structure, leaving a gap of light that defines and differentiates between the traditional and the contemporary.

(The exhibition on show features Michael Lee Hong Hwee's - A Psychotaxonomy of Home.)
FARM TONG TONG FRIENDSHIP STORE
Tong Tong Friendship Store
This rosy-tinted curved wall swirls through the shop, serves as an intricate backdrop
to display the dresses, and like a coquettish woman who coyly reveals and seduces,
beckons the visitor into an exquisite tea room at the end of the shop.
Size: 50 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2008
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Peter Sim, Torrance Goh, Hong Weiming   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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It’s perhaps second nature that as architects we pay attention to what we wear; fashion and architecture share close bonds – the texture of materials, colors, structure, geometry, crafting and the perfect ‘fit’. The Tong Tong Friendship Store is a quaint little shop selling quirky and cheekily reinvented traditional Chinese-inspired dresses and clothes designed by Tan Sheau Yun.

The site and surrounding context provide challenges and direction to the design. Tucked in a corner of the mall, it clearly needs attention. But also, we wanted to create an intimate ambience within the shop – an inner sanctum that is shielded from the public thoroughfare.
Our main design gesture is simple and achieves these aims. Alluding to the Tong Tong’s design philosophy of reinvention of the old, we designed a sinuous curved wall using concrete ventilation blocks commonly found in our old local shophouse. This rosy-tinted curved wall swirls through the shop, serves as an intricate backdrop to display the dresses, and like a coquettish woman who coyly reveals and seduces, beckons the visitor into an exquisite tea room at the end of the shop. From here the visitor can rest her weary feet, sip a warm cup of tea, and "be friends with chinese culture".
FARM SUPERGARDEN
SUPERGARDEN
SUPERGARDEN presents design culture in Singapore at a moment where
architecture is actively redefining its aesthetic, professional and
intellectual boundaries in relation to other design fields.
Size: 500 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2008
Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition, Curatorial
Team: Torrance Goh, Peter Sim, Dr Lilian Chee   /  Collaborators: DesignAct, Re:Act   /  Photographer: Jing Quek
 
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FARM was appointed the lead curator and designer of the Singapore Pavilion at the 11th Venice International Architecture Biennale 2008 after winning an open competition organised by DesignSingapore Council.

The pavilion is called SUPERGARDEN. SUPERGARDEN presents design culture in Singapore at a moment where architecture is actively redefining its aesthetic, professional and intellectual boundaries in relation to other design fields. The main focus of the Singapore Pavilion is housed within a room where a huge table stretches across its entire length and displays 22 different
objects each contributed by artists and designers.

Each object is accompanied by a series of conversations documenting an exchange of ideas between the contributor and other designers. These conversations emanate from specially constructed sound domes that hover above the audience, and create a symphonious banter of design ideas. Together, this enmeshed aural soundscape and visual landscape of objects create fresh and unseen connections between a new generation of Singaporean architects and designers.
FARM 170, TELOK KURAU
170, Telok Kurau
An architect’s own abode is as intriguing and prone to inquisitive eyes as
your Hollywood celebrity’s villa. We eagerly want to know
how they live and what’s in their living room.
Size: 220 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2008
Type: Residential   /  Services: Interior
Team: Peter Sim   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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An architect’s own abode is as intriguing and prone to inquisitive eyes as your Hollywood celebrity’s villa. We eagerly want to know how they live and what’s in their living room – the former an arbiter of taste; the latter tries to uphold such taste, in the public’s eye.

Serving as the home for an architectural academic, her family and an enormous collection of books, meant that the study had to come first. The house was built in the late 1960s and we wanted to keep the original feel of those terrace houses with its generous balconies and bedrooms. The study was given pride of place at the front of the house on the ground floor,
facing a new walled garden, and the rest of the house fell naturally into place.

The entire design then pivots around this study. We envisioned one at the writing desk, looking outwards. Thus, views become important. We replaced the original windows and doors with large sliding glass doors which now frame views out into the gardens and inwards into the house.

We reclaimed the front porch and turned it into timber decked verandah so that the study faces the wooden decked porch and flows seamlessly into tranquil garden.
FARM 2494
2494
The possibility to produce architecture by negotiating between two different mediums -
a media-based representation, and a more systematic and hands-on manipulation
of the material itself, is attractive in itself.
Size: 40 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2008
Type: Sculpture
Team: Peter Sim, Xu Naiyan   /  Collaborators: kwodrent   /  Photographer: kwodrent
 
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When approached by Grace Tan of kwodrent to collaborate on her newest project "envelop", we were immediately intrigued by the proposal - a process-driven project with an emphasis on manifesting concept and technique.

We love how kwodrent’s work methodology is derivative from a tactile relationship with her medium, in her case fabric, in order to discover its inherent logic. The possibility to produce architecture by negotiating between two different mediums - a media-based representation, and a more systematic and hands-on manipulation of the material itself, is attractive in itself.
Although the traditional materials of buildings are bricks, mortar, steel and glass, the architect’s primary medium of expression is ostensibly paper. We doodle, sketch, and draw on this medium. As much as we love computers and 3D modelling software, our first step in translating an idea is usually through sketches on paper.

Using 2494 folded sheets of standard A4 sized paper, we have attempted to explore the relationship between idea, representation, media and object. Paper is used to conceive, draw, and then make this installation.
FARM HIDE&SEEK
HIDE&SEEK
This simple game of hide-and-seek engages us in the eagerness to
explore and find, and the thrill of discovery. With these ideas in our mind,
we started our design for HIDE&SEEK,
Size: 200 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2008
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Torrance Goh, Hong Weiming   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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“Close your eyes and count to ten….”

We’ve all played this childhood game before: I close my eyes, you run off, hiding in some secret corner and I’ll seek you out. This simple game of hide-and-seek engages us in the eagerness to explore and find, and the thrill of discovery. With these ideas in our mind, we started our design for HIDE&SEEK, a 2 storey fashion boutique in a postwar building in Chinatown by local designer Keith Png.

The lower floor, ‘HIDE’ is a dark, mysterious space, where the haute couture KOOPS label is
accommodated. Here surfaces are sleek and black, and individual dresses are shown like exhibits which float in space, each beneath its own line of glowing light.

The upper floor, ‘SEEK’ is the exact opposite of ‘HIDE’, it’s a multi coloured tunnel where each band of colour is occupied by a different local designer label.
Here the clothes are hung from wooden planks suspended from the ceiling with manila ropes, much like rudimentary swings. The colour bands envelopes all: floor walls, ceiling and even the windows.

“Ready or not here I come…”
FARM KULT OFFICE
KULT Office
The office is designed like a lab. Staff work at rows of lab benches, and
the pantry and entrance gallery are designed like gas extract chambers,
only here, these are painted a mesmerizing blue
Size: 130 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2008
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Peter Sim, Adib Jalal   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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Office design frequently involves producing boring cubicles, which in turn breed a work culture of isolation, lack of communication, and ultimately, despair. Not here.

Located in a former school atop Mount Sophia, the inspiration for this PR and advertising agency was to return to the uncertainty and excitement of the classroom laboratory.

The office is designed like a lab. Staff work at rows of lab benches, and the pantry and entrance gallery are designed like gas extract chambers, only here, these are painted a mesmerizing
blue. The ceiling is a vast sea of test tubes that form a lighting installation spelling out the name K U L T. Sitting on the shelves alongside magazines, graphic books and A4 ring binders are vials, beaker and pipettes containing unknown substances and various multi-coloured liquids.

This classroom theme references the previous life and use of the building. It also reflects the quirky and experimental nature of the agency’s work. The Kult Office is meant to be a laboratory for ideas. We certainly hope this space will breed some truly eccentric creative types.
FARM THE PRINCE OF GOWNS EXHIBITION
The Prince of Gowns Exhibition
Exploring the two-dimensionality of paintings, we collaborated with graphic artist
Sek Eng to design the exhibition as a series of life size papertole drawings. Eng created
a series of pen and ink drawings of objects from various romantic paintings.
Size: 80 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2007
Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition
Team: Torrance Goh   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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Benny Ong is arguably one of Singapore’s most well known fashion designers. With a clientele of celebrities, royalty and renowned companies such as Harrods and Raffles Hotel, we were terribly excited to add a touch of glamour to our oeuvre of work.

Prince of Gowns was an exhibition showing 10 gowns inspired by romantic Neo-Classical oil paintings.

We wanted to reflect this influence of art in Ong’s work and re-imagined the space as an art gallery. Exploring the two-dimensionality of paintings, we collaborated with graphic artist
Sek Eng to design the exhibition as a series of life size papertole drawings. Eng created a series of pen and ink drawings of objects from various romantic paintings. We then layered these to create backdrops with the illusion of depth.

Ong’s gowns were centrepieces to these “paintings”. The gowns were composed behind oversized picture frames and suspended from the ceiling. On a glamorous opening night full of beautiful and well dressed people, we were especially pleased when Ong told us that he was delighted with the way the exhibition had turned out.
FARM THEATREWORKS V.I.S.T.A LAB
TheatreWorks V.I.S.T.A Lab
In the case of VISTA, our role as the set designer takes on a wider meaning -
the performances occurs in a single space, blurring the boundaries
between performers and audience.
Size: 300 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2007
Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition
Team: Torrance Goh
 
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There’s always something seductive about theatre set design. Built to represent narratives using architectural and spatial language, freedom and imagination are given free rein here (well almost, and more than a real building project, of course).

In the case of multimedia performance, VISTA, our role as the set designer takes on a wider meaning - the performances occurs in a single space, blurring the boundaries between performers and audience. The set would thus include the entire spatial configuration for performers and audience.

The first performance, Impetus, explores how events in our history are being recorded,
forgotten and fabricated. A network of PVC pipes was created as a metaphor of the HDB flats. But instead of wastewater and sewage, the pipes are used to transmit multimedia visuals and audio to the audience.

In the second performance, Interference, the direction was to have a common space shared by audience and performers. Reacting to the theme of frequencies, the stage becomes circumambulative. The audience are seated in the middle where a hill was created out of existing gallery risers. The performance took place around this hill, turning existing spatial corners and walls between columns into works of colours, videos and dance.
FARM ENG HOON STREET APARTMENT
Eng Hoon Street Apartment
Call us sentimental, but we wanted this apartment interior to capture
some of that filmic nostalgia and romanticism, which we felt
was deeply embedded in this area.
Year: Completion 2007
Type: Residential   /  Services: Interior
Team: Selwyn Low, Hong Weiming   /  Photographer: Little Nomad Pictures
 
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We are a bunch of romantics.

At Tiong Bahru, the mix of conserved modernist architecture, back lanes and narrow streets set the perfect stage for a melancholic urban narrative.
Call us sentimental, but we wanted this apartment interior to capture some of that filmic nostalgia and romanticism, which we felt was deeply embedded in this area.

The client wanted to explore how his new pad could be configured to cater to his needs and collection of eclectic furniture.
Spatial reconfiguration was kept minimal and subtle. To us, it was essential also to pay homage to the inherent aesthetics of the original apartment. A main wall was removed to create a larger and more defined living room.

As idiosyncratic as they are eclectic, the collected furniture ranges from Konstantin Grcic’s Chair One to Eero Saarinen’s Tulip Chair. Justin Lee’s Pop art inspired fiery-red Chinese motifs adorns a sliding partition in the living space that hides a study. Fellow local artist Tang Ling Nah’s haunting black and white charcoal drawing of the Singapore cityscape acts a balanced counterpoint in the dining room.
FARM WOODCUT TABLE
Woodcut Table

Type:   /  Services: Objects
 
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This has got to be our simplest brief - to design a table. We like this return to basics, but we also couldn’t resist doing something more. Commissioned as part of the ‘Archive in Motion: 50 Years Documenta 1955 – 2005’ exhibition, this 12-metre long table was designed to compliment artist Justin Lee’s woodcut interactive art installation.

Lee’s artwork was a series of wood relief carvings or ‘woodcuts’ which would be used by the viewers as stencils to create their own compositions. It actively engages the viewer in the making of art and to a certain extent, relinquishes the idea of artist as master. We were inspired by this simple transformation of the individual woodcuts to an infinite number of varied artworks.
We wanted to make a table that ‘transforms’ and morphs literally from a flat rectilinear tabletop surface to an amorphous organic base that behaves like molten lava. To achieve this, we simply stuck layers upon layers of precision cut plywood on top of one another where each layer has a slightly different outline resulting in a truly fluid appearance.
FARM STIFF CHILLI RESTAURANT
Stiff Chilli Restaurant
We loved the original shophouse for its rough and dilapidated beauty. We wanted
these features to be retained rather than papered over. Instinctively, it called for a robust
yet laid back response, which would allow the original building to be appreciated.
Size: 160 square metres  /   Year: Completion 2007
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Torrance Goh, Selwyn Low   /  Photographer: Jeremy San Tzer Ning
 
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A restaurateur from Australia opening an Italian restaurant originating from Bali, and located in the historic district of Jalan Besar, below a traditional Chinese Clan shophouse – what an absolutely fantastic combination!

We loved the original shophouse for its rough and dilapidated beauty. We wanted these features to be retained rather than papered over. Instinctively, it called for a robust yet laid back response, which would allow the original building to be appreciated.

The existing shophouse was divided into three distinct spaces - entrance, middle and rear yard, which would offer different dining experiences. We tie these spaces together with a bright green
pathway that traverses through the house. At the entrance is an open cafe space. In the middle, there are intimate dining booths and a bar area. At the rear, the green path steps up through an existing window opening (now serving as a doorway), into the external courtyard dining area where a large wood oven is also located.

We collaborated with product designer Casey Chen in the lamp designs. Playing inventively with local plastic food covers, Casey created a series of delightful lamps of varying sizes. These lamps add texture and ambience to the space by bringing back the familiar in quirky new ways.
FARM NATIONAL ART GALLERY
National Art Gallery
A contemporary architectural element inspired by the mythical Southeast Asian dragon
called the Naga, weaves through these monuments to connect, enclose,
and invite, bringing together the City and Art.
Size: 60000 square metres  /   Year: Competition 2007
Type: Culture   /  Services: Interior, Architecture
Team: Peter Sim, Selwyn Low, Torrance Goh
 
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An architectural competition was organised to convert the former City Hall and Supreme Court buildings to our new National Art Gallery.

We read this twinned site as a rich historical-artistic object in itself, capable of generating a contemporary response from artists and their public. Our proposal attempts to engage three key notions. First, to contemporize the historical event space of the ‘Surrender Chamber’ at City Hall as a thematic strategy for curating art. Second, to create a new vast public arena on the second level of the City Hall. Lastly, to make two spatially different homes for art, drawing on the distinct spatialities of each monument.
A contemporary architectural element inspired by the mythical Southeast Asian dragon called the Naga, weaves through these monuments to connect, enclose, and invite, bringing together the City and Art. The Naga as an architectural device takes on various functions, forms and scales to reinforce the historical contexts and negotiate future spaces. Rising and uncoiling from within the interior of City Hall, it infiltrates the two monuments variously as skin, façade, wall, roof, platform, gallery and bridge. It creates exciting new spaces, moments and events to embrace the city, to enclose art, to provide orientation and to breathe new life into the old.
FARM HO WAH TRAVEL SHOP
Ho Wah Travel Shop
The layout of the shop, a longitudinal space that is open on both ends,
prompted us to imagine the shop as a continuous, swirling organic
red surface that stretched between the two open ends.
Year: Completion 2007
Type: Commerical   /  Services: Interior
Team: Torrance Goh, Selwyn Low   /  Photographer: Caleb Ming
 
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Situated in a long and narrow unit in People’s Park Centre, the design for this travel agency sought to re-interpret the idiosyncratic Chinatown retail experience. The layout of the shop, a longitudinal space that is open on both ends, prompted us to imagine the shop as a continuous, swirling organic red surface that stretched between the two open ends.

Acting both as a directional and defining architectural element in the space, the red surface serves several functions. It is a catwalk that traverses across the entire space drawing in customers and leads them to reception areas. It defines working zones and forms the
working surfaces and storage. It is an enclosure that provides privacy to the luxurious boss’s office. It is a seat. It is a refreshment area for customers.

The design was developed through collaboration with Pop Artist Justin Lee, well known for his use of cross-cultural pop motifs. He designed intricate abstracted Chinese patterns of wafting clouds alongside secondary motifs of trees, birds and flowers. This rich visual tapestry was realized using in-laid mosaic tiles, turning the entire space into a highly sensuous and tactile experience.
FARM DOGHOUSE
Doghouse
Year: Completion 2006
Type: Residential   /  Services: Interior
Team: Tiah Nan Chyuan, Torrance Goh, Selwyn Low
 
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This living space and dog biscuit bakery was commissioned for a young couple and their 2 dogs - Bd and WangWang. Right from the beginning, the clients wanted a unique space.

They were very keen to explore the design possibilities within their existing apartment’s awkward layout. The idea had to reflect a unique lifestyle where the dogs could play a central role.
Doghouse is a structure that nestles within, and reacts organically to, the oddly shaped living room. It operates like a piece of furniture that surrounds, changes and adapts to the lives and habits of its 4 inhabitants. It is simultaneously many things: a chill out area, a kitchen, a dining space, a doghouse, a showcase and a study! Doghouse morphs from one function to another, re-defining space with each transformation.

Bd & WangWang were not only a source of inspiration for features such as the dog-sized holes cut into furniture and the dog specific route, but were also actively involved in the building process - you can find their paw prints on the concrete entrance platform!