Tang Shipwreck Gallery
The most outstanding element is a wave of Changsha ceramic bowls, which crests along
the length of two display areas. An abstraction of turbulence and momentum,
the wave mimics the origins of the artefacts.
Location: Singapore  /   Year: Completion 2015
Type: Culture   /  Services: Exhibition, Branding
Team: Peter Sim, Dylan Quek, Kenneth Koh, Benedict Tay, Susanne Teng, Sarah Lew   /  Photographer: Beton Brut
 
FARM_TANG_SHIPWRECK_GALLERY_01.jpg
FARM_TANG_SHIPWRECK_GALLERY_02.jpg
FARM_TANG_SHIPWRECK_GALLERY_04.jpg
FARM_TANG_SHIPWRECK_GALLERY_05.jpg
FARM_TANG_SHIPWRECK_GALLERY_06.jpg FARM_TANG_SHIPWRECK_GALLERY_07.jpg
FARM_TANG_SHIPWRECK_GALLERY_08.jpg FARM_TANG_SHIPWRECK_GALLERY_09.jpg
Geographically located along many historical trade routes, Singapore’s origins as a state and country are deeply anchored in its previous status as a fishing town and port. Maritime history becomes a key part of situating Singapore within the 9th century, through tracing its interactions with the world at large.

The Tang Shipwreck permanent exhibition, housed in the Khoo Teck Puat Gallery of the Asian Civilisations Museum’s new Riverfront Wing, comprises an impressive collection of ceramics, gold and silver objects chronicling trade between China, the Islamic world and Southeast Asia.

In deference to the beauty and importance of these artefacts, the exhibition layout is kept porous, flexible and quiet. A circulation path is not dictated, encouraging visitors to wander through at their own pace. Exhibit plinths are raised off the floor and are coloured in a darker, neutral palette, taking a back seat to the objects on display. Glass cases house the collection, inviting examination from a multitude of angles. The physical infrastructure is non-intrusive, creating a sense of transparency that permeates the exhibit.
This transparency allows visitors to immediately glimpse the entirety of the exhibition, provoking their curiosity to draw closer and consider each object at length. The most outstanding element is a wave of Changsha ceramic bowls, which crests along the length of two display areas. An abstraction of turbulence and momentum, the wave mimics the origins of the artefacts.

Through an honest and respectful presentation of these beautiful objects, the Tang Shipwreck exhibition places the interaction between visitor and artefact at the forefront of its design considerations. The narrative conclusion of the exhibit becomes unique to each individual, a private understanding reached between them and the remnants of history.